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Most important trade deal is with the EU: British PM

Most important trade deal is with the EU: British PM

REUTERS
LONDON
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Tuesday that the most important free trade deal that Britain needed to strike was with the European Union.
Britain is due to leave the EU on October 31 and Johnson has said he is prepared for an exit whether or not any withdrawal agreement has been struck with the bloc.
Johnson is seeking a deal with the EU but has not ruled out suspending parliament to prevent lawmakers’ attempts to block a no-deal exit.
“The single biggest deal that we need to do is a free trade agreement with our friends and partners over the Channel,” he told Sky News.
On Monday, US national security adviser John Bolton said the United States would enthusiastically support a no-deal Brexit if that was what the British government decided to do and would seek to work fast on a free trade agreement.
“In my experience, the Americans are very tough negotiators indeed and we will do a great deal with them and it will open up opportunities for businesses, particularly services companies in the US,” Johnson said. “It will be a tough old haggle but we’ll get there.”
Meanwhile, more Britons would support Prime Minister Boris Johnson using any means necessary to take Britain out of the European Union than would oppose him, an opinion poll conducted for the Daily Telegraph said on Monday.
A ComRes opinion poll showed 54 percent of respondents with an opinion on the matter said they agreed with the statement: “Boris (Johnson) needs to deliver Brexit by any means, including suspending parliament if necessary, in order to prevent MPs (Members of Parliament) from stopping it.”
The poll showed 46 percent disagreed with the statement. The result was based on the answers of 1,645 respondents, after those who said they did not know their preference had been excluded.
If the undecided are included, the figures are 44 percent ‘agree’, 37 percent ‘disagree’ and 19 percent ‘don’t know’.
The same survey found support for the Conservative Party had risen by 6 percentage points to 31 percent, compared with 27 percent who said they would back the opposition Labour Party. That result was based on 1,783 responses.
That finding is largely in line with other polls showing an increase in support for the Conservatives since Johnson took over from Theresa May, who formally quit last month having failed to deliver Brexit on schedule.

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